SYLLABUS
ELECTRONIC MEDIA MANAGEMENT
COMM 341 Section 01
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, COMMUNICATION AND FINE ARTS

SPRING, 2014

Last updated:  January 12, 2014

INSTRUCTOR: AJ Miceli
OFFICE LOCATION: Rm. 007 Scottino Hall
PHONES: 871-7492 (Office) 454-2976 (Home)
E-mail:  miceli@gannon.edu (primary gannon address)
              ajmiceli@verizon.net  (personal e-mail)
Twitter @AJMiceli
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/aj.miceli
ONLINE SYLLABUS -- http://www.ajmiceli.com/syllabus/comm341-2013.html
Scheduled Office Hours: MWF 10:45A - 11:30A    TR 8:45A -- 9:20A, 11:00A-11:45A
Others by appointment
Class Meeting Times: MW, 12:20P-1:40P
Credit Hours: 3

REQUIRED TEXT: Management of Electronic Media, 5th Edition Alan B. Albarran

COURSE DESCRIPTION

A study of the basic principles of management theory as they apply specifically to broadcast station organization, programming, sales, engineering, and the broadcast regulatory environment using both lecture and case study approaches.

DEPARTMENTAL OUTCOMES ADDRESSED:
TCAFA Outcome #2: The student will be able to research, write and deliver a sustained-form business presentation using appropriate rhetorical strategies and technology.
TCAFA Outcome #4: The student will understand and participate in the patterns of scholarly and productive discussion using both interpersonal and professional skills.
TCAFA Outcome #7: The student will recognize the need for adaptability/resilience in the theatre and the electronic arts, and be able to collaborate with faculty, peers, and technology to produce quality theatrical and electronic projects.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Upon completion of the course a student will:

1) Demonstrate an understanding of how general management theories relate to the broadcast, cable and performing arts environment
2) Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic operating environment of the telecommunications and entertainment industries
3) Demonstrate an understanding of how the various functions of an organization work together to achieve a common goal
4) Demonstrate an understanding of how telecommunications and entertainment businesses earn a responsible profit
5) Demonstrate the ability to research a business case study
6) Demonstrate an ability to work together and to make professional oral presentations

THE COURSE

Reading assignments in the text will be given in advance of the classes during which we will cover the material. Because the chapters are relatively short but packed with information, reading the chapter before we cover the material in class is imperative. Material in the text will be explicated and supplemented during lectures.

We will also be using many simulations from other sources. The class will be divided into groups and each group will be responsible for fully preparing each case study. Thursdays will generally be simulation days. Groups will compete against each other in presenting solutions or answers to the case studies. After each simulation the groups will be ranked, the best presentation receiving a "1", the next a "2", etc. Your group grade will be determined by adding up the number of first places and so on. Presentations will be judged on the basis of completeness, broad based research, organization, visual aids, oral style, appearance, credibility, professionalism, and others.

Because of the nature of the cases, reading ahead in the text will certainly be of value to you and your group.
 

ATTENDANCE

Your attendance is expected. Attendance will be taken daily. Rules regarding freshman attendance and absences found in the student handbook will be followed. Much of the test material will be drawn from class notes, including the "current events" portion of each class.

For a much fuller treatment of the attendance policy, see the 2013-2014 Student Handbook.  

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Academic honesty is an extremely important virtue of students and scholars. Any students, therefore, found guilty of serious academic dishonesty (e.g. cheating during exams, plagiarism, etc.) may receive a failing grade for the course. See the 2013-2014 Student Handbook for the Gannon University Code of Academic Integrity.

 

RESOLUTION OF CONCERN WITH AN INSTRUCTOR

 

If you have a concern with an instructor or a course, the resolution begins by speaking with the instructor.  If the concern continues after this conversation, speak with the chair/director of the instructor’s department.  Any continuing concerns should be taken to the Dean’s Office in the College of Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences in PAC 2024.

CELL PHONES AND ELECTRONIC DEVICES

Cell phones and other electronic devices must be turned off in class and placed out of sight throughout each class period.  Students with a confirmed “emergency” situation must receive approval from the professor before class for any exceptions to be granted.

Guidelines and rules for good classroom behavior will be presented in class.

ASSIGNMENTS, ASSESSMENT, AND GRADING:

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:

OUTCOME OR OBJECTIVE

EXAM

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT

GROUP CASE PRESENTATION

TCAFA #2

X

TCAFA #4

X

TCAFA #7

X

CO #1

X

CO #2

X

CO #3

X

CO #4

X

X

X

CO #5

X

X

X

CO #6

X

X

There will be a mid-term and a final exam.

The final grade will consist of:  Mid-Term Exam 25%, Case Studies 40%, Company Reports and Stock Portfolio 10%, Final Exam 25%.

Group Case Studies will be graded with letter grades.  Individual student grades for group work can also have a "plus" or a "minus" attached to them, based on participation.  For calculation purposes, the following numeric translations will be used:

A = 94 pts    B = 84 pts    C = 74 pts    D = 65 pts    F = 40 pts
"plus" = plus 4 pts
"minus' = minus 6 pts

GRADING SCALE:  

98 - 100 = A+
94 - 97 = A

91 - 93 = A-
88 - 90 = B+
84 - 87 = B
81 - 83 = B-
           78 - 80 = C+
71 - 77 = C
68 - 70 = C-
60 - 67 = D
Below 60 = F

Your instructor follows the guidelines of "Fair Classroom Procedure" described in the 2013-2014 Student Handbook.

SUPPLEMENTAL READING: This will be important. You should find some portions of the previous texts for this course still relevant and helpful. The library also contains several other texts which might help, especially during your case study research. And, it goes without saying that Broadcasting & Cable magazine, TV Week Online magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and many other periodicals should be most valuable in keeping you up-to-date on developments that could affect your case studies and text material. Much of the current info is also available online.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE:

Jan. 13 – Chapter 1 Managing Electronic and Digital Media
Jan. 29 – Chapter 2 The Media Marketplace: Markets, Mergers, Alliances and Partnerships
Skip Chapter 3
Feb 3 – Chapter 4 Theories of Mgt
Feb.10 – Chapter 5 Financial Mgt
Feb. 26 – Mid-Term Exam
Mar. 10 – Chapter 6 Managing Personnel
Skip Chapter 7
Mar. 19 – Case #1
Mar. 24 – Chapter 8 Content: Strategy and Distribution
Mar. 31 – Case #2
Apr. 2 -- Chapter 9 Marketing and Sales
Apr. 7– Case #3
Apr. 9 – Chapter 10 News and News Management
Apr. 16 – Case #4
Apr. 14 – Chapter 11 Regulatory Influences on Media Management
Apr. 23 -- Case 5
Apr. 28 – Chapter 12 Technology Influence on Media Management & Chapter 13 Social Media Influence on Media Management
Apr 30 – Case #6
Wednesday, May 7 11:00 AM Final Exam

Finally, some words of advice from a General Manager (not me): "If you want to be GM you'll need aspirin, money, patience, aspirin, knowledge of the industry, aspirin, some street fighting ability, aspirin, aspirin, money, aspirin..."